Top 20 Spring CDs

Ah, Spring. Spring is the time when everyone loses their minds and starts walking around in shoes with no socks, shirts with no sleeves, and pants that end at the knees even on days when the temperature barely reaches 10-15 degrees Celcius. Or even below that. It depends on how sunny it is and how harsh last winter was.

After completing this top 20, it seems that for me, generally speaking, guitar rythms seem to flow nicely in the windy Spring breeze.

But there are also a few excentricities.

Runner up: Squirrel Nut Zippers, Perennial Favorites (1998) & Hot (1996)

Watch out, the squirrels are coming out swinging to some jazzy bluesy swing revival!

20. Karma Wears White Ties, Wesley (2016)

Ah… a starry Spring night. This indie dreampop/shoegaze band makes me feel like Summer is almost here (even if I had to wear my scarf while waiting for the bus this morning).

19. Louise attaque, Louise attaque (1997)

Louise Attaque’s classic album with its fast violin, guitar, and drumming, fits well on a windy Spring day.

18. Benjamin Francis Leftwich, Last Smoke Before the Snow Storm (2011)

Lovely smooth guitar rythms on a lovely day spent doing nothing at the foot of a large tree, watching the rasy of light through the moving leaves.

17. Jethro Tull, This Was (1968)

Blues rock is always a good idea. It may be Anderson’s flute that gives it a Spring feel.

16. The Rolling Stones, Hot Rocks 1964-1971 (1971)

Rocks are heating up under the Spring sun.

15. Beaties Boys, Paul’s Boutique (1989)

Time for a little Spring garage sale. I’m taking the banjo.

14. Lost in Translation Soundtrack (2003)

Spring’s a time for contemplation and meditation, on all the nuances that are lost in translation (and boy are there many).

13. The Paper Kites, Woodland (2011)

It’s just a bit too early here for a walk in the neighbouring woods (too muddy), so the birds are all alone and consequently overjoyed.

12. Wolf Parade, Apologies to Queen Mary (2005)

This hypnotic music is rather melancholic and might work best on a rainy Spring day.

11. Eric’s Trip, Love Tara (1993)

Remember your teen years, when Spring was about new romantic possibilities… and cruel heartaches.

10. Violent Femmes, Violent Femmes (1983)

Adolescent frustrations are expressed quite differently here. For a very windy Spring day.

9. MC Solaar, Qui sème le vent récolte le tempo (1991)

Solaar’s rythms flow well on a Spring breeze. And Spring is a good time to listen to poetry.

8. Leonard Cohen, Greatest Hits (1975)

Another Spring album that is made for reflection. On an evening perhaps, with a glass of wine. Or at dawn, with tea and oranges (or a glass of wine, it depends how late/early it is).

7. Ani Di Franco, Like I said (1994)

A classic and particularly intimate Ani album, with great acoustic guitar rythms. And, as always, the lyrics hit you straight in the gut (in a good way).

6. Belle and Sebastian, Dear Catastrophe Waitress (2003)

LOVE THAT SHIRT.

5. Bob Dylan, The Essential Bob Dylan (2000)

Essential indeed, and incidentally, it all flows quite well through the Spring leaves.

4. Pixies, Waves of Mutilation – Best of Pixies (2004)

My mind is floating nicely.

3. Iron and Wine, Live at Norfolk (2009)

I want to cuddle into this awesome guy’s voice and take in all those nostalgic poetic truths.

2. Sonic Youth, Daydream Nation (1988)

A little distortion for rainy Spring evenings.

1. Lou Reed, The Transformer (1972)

Spring chillin.

 

 

 

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Iron and wine, Dustin Tebbutt : thanks for reminding me that I’m “indie folk” above all else

It’s been about two years since I posted here! Time sure flies by fast. So how can I mark this glorious comeback? Maybe by going back to the roots.

I’ve been a music lover ever since I can remember. When I was ten, my parents bought me a radio-cassette player and it completely changed my life. I’d hear a song that I liked playing on the kitchen radio while my parents were making dinner, and I’d run upstairs to my room like a mad person to press the record button. The sound quality was awefull and I could hear the DJ’s voice over the first or last 10 seconds of the song… but it was soooo worth it. I made countless mixed tapes since then, which remain, in my view, the best compilations ever and I still listen to them, once in a while. As a teenager and young adult, I worked (if you can call it work 🙂 ) at the school’s, then the university’s radio station where I had access to local demo tapes (very bad audio, once again, but these local bands were intense, so it doesn’t matter, right?). I listened to so many songs, so many styles… “as long as it’s good” is what I used to say to people asking me what type of music I liked. Songs accompanied me always, through good times and bad times (especially bad times).

Ah, the good old days.

After having kids, while still listening to music, I slowed down and lowered the sound a little, to be able to hear their shy and cute baby voices. Work and everything else got more intense and I’d basically just crawl up to bed every night dead tired. That, coupled with the fact that I am utterly useless with technology (I concluded that IT hates me) so even the easiest thing nano Ipod or whatnot would die out on me after a while. And yet, lately, it’s been irritating me. It’s been getting under my skin. I want to listen to something new, something good. Something that will really catch my interest, like back then.

Now, thanks to those youtubers who post really great music compilations, out of the blue, I found a few wonderful indie bands that I had never heard of before.

Dustin Tebbutt is an australian singer-songwriter, who’s debut EP “The Breach” has met critically acclaim, and for good reason. The eponym song is haunting, in a good way. It flows smoothly… and endlessly, since I listen to it on repeat. It’s been a while since I’ve listened to something on repeat.

Iron and Wine is an american singer-songwriter who already released several albums, and some of them were extremely well-received by critics, notably the wonderful “Our endless numbered days”. This talented and charismatic bearded fellow has apparently lived though a difficult time in the bible belt where he was raised, but came out of it with a very open and mature philosophy, as quoted in the Telegraph : “That was a confusing time for me, but I don’t miss being misled. I’m not an atheist. There’s an undeniable unseen world that some people call God and think they know more about than other people. I try not to get hung up on the names.” Well said, my friend. In these days of uncertainty and fear, your openness is welcome. So is your music!

I’m adding these two to my list, and if I can make it through my mourning period following the death of Leonard Cohen, I’ll expand my musical research and listen to their other, more recent CDs, and share the results.

Greatings and salutations to all WordPress bloggers!